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Poster Abstracts

Evidence for the use of patient reported outcome measures to improve healthcare in non-communicable diseases: a systematic review

Authors:

Kirstine Benthien ,

Center For Clinical Research And Prevention, Frederiksberg University Hospital, Denmark, DK
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Benedikte Irene von Osmanski,

DK
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Marie Villumsen

DK
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Abstract

Introduction: Healthcare professionals may overlook and underestimate patients’ symptoms. Hypothetically, a systematic assessment of patient reported outcomes measures (PROMs) will help identify symptoms or problems otherwise overlooked and enable clinicians to screen patients, optimise treatment plans, and improve communication. Despite widespread implementation activities, the evidence is unknown.

Aims and methods: The aim of this study was to systematically review the literature on use of PROMs to improve clinical care of patients with diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), heart disease, rheumatoid arthritis, and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) (PROSPERO reg. no. CRD42021226896). Published randomised controlled trials on the use of PROMs for clinical purposes such as screening or decision-making were searched in the following databases: PubMed/MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE, and Web of Science. The searches were restricted to English and July 2021. Each title, abstract, and relevant full text, was screened and risk of bias was assessed by at least two researchers.

Results: The search identified 19678 unique articles that were screened for title and abstract, and 601 full-text articles were assessed to include 53 trials. Fifteen studies included patients with heart diseases, 13 included patients with COPD, patients with diabetes and IBD each had nine trials, six included rheumatoid arthritis, and one trial had mixed diagnoses. The most common method of administration was telephone, followed by devices and apps, and 40% of trials applied validated questionnaires. All interventions included screening and some support for decisions or dialogue. Of 53 trials, eleven had favourable results, none of which included patients with diabetes. Risk of bias was high in 22 trials, whereas six trials had low risk of bias. Trials with high risk of bias had more favourable results. The six trials with favourable results and medium to low risk of bias were characterised by integrated decision support, predefined cut-off points, and symptom-oriented questionnaires.

Conclusion: The evidence on clinical use of PROMs in non-communicable diseases is sparse with few trials with low or medium risk of bias.

Implications: The current evidence on clinical use of PROMs speaks against implementation but warrants further development integrated with research evaluation. Future interventions should include integrated decision support, cut-off points, and symptom-oriented questionnaires.
How to Cite: Benthien K, von Osmanski BI, Villumsen M. Evidence for the use of patient reported outcome measures to improve healthcare in non-communicable diseases: a systematic review. International Journal of Integrated Care. 2022;22(S3):225. DOI: http://doi.org/10.5334/ijic.ICIC22331
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Published on 04 Nov 2022.

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