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Research & theory

Integrated care in Norway: State of affairs years after regulation by law

Authors:

Jorunn Bjerkan ,

Norwegian University of Science and Technology, NO
About Jorunn

RN, PhD Candidate

 

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Marie Richter,

Norwegian University of Science and Technology, NO
About Marie

MI, BLS

Faculty of Medicine, The Norwegian EHR Research Centre

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Anders Grimsmo,

Norwegian University of Science and Technology, NO
About Anders

PhD, Professor,

Faculty of Medicine, The Norwegian EHR Research Centre

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Ragnhild Hellesø,

University of Oslo, NO
About Ragnhild

RN, PhD, Post-doctoral research Fellow

Faculty of Medicine, Institute of Helalth and Society, Departement of Nursing and Health Sciences

 

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Jytte Brender

Aalborg University, DK
About Jytte
PhD, MSc, MSc, Assosiate professor, Dept. of Health Science & Technology, and Virtual Center of Health Informatics
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Abstract

Introduction: A mandatory multidisciplinary plan for individual care, the 'Individual care Plan', was introduced by law in Norway in 2001. The regulation was established to meet the need for improved efficiency and quality of health and social services, and to increase patient involvement. The plan was intended for patients with long-term and complex needs for coordinated care. The aim of this study was to elaborate on knowledge of such planning processes in Norwegian municipalities.

Method: A piloted questionnaire was sent to 92 randomly selected municipalities in 2005-2006, addressing local organization and participation in the work with individual care plans. Local political governance, size of the population, funds available for health care, and problems related to living conditions were indicators for analysing the extent to which the individual care plan was used five years after the regulation was introduced.

Results: Our results showed that 0.5% as opposed to an expected 3% of the population had an individual care plan. This was independent of the political, social and financial situation in the municipalities or the way the planning process had been carried out. The planning process was mostly taken care of by local health and social care professionals, rather than by hospital staff and general practitioners.

Discussion and conclusion: The low number of care plans and the oblique responsibility among professionals for planning showed that the objectives of the national initiative had not been achieved. More research is needed to determine the reasons for this lack of success and to contribute to solutions for improved multidisciplinary cooperation.

How to Cite: Bjerkan J, Richter M, Grimsmo A, Hellesø R, Brender J. Integrated care in Norway: State of affairs years after regulation by law. International Journal of Integrated Care. 2011;11(1):None. DOI: http://doi.org/10.5334/ijic.530
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Published on 31 Jan 2011.
Peer Reviewed

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